Project Insaka

The Issue

Pregnancy is often the point at which young women first discover their HIV status. Such discovery across sub-Saharan Africa remains both highly common in young people and highly stigmatised. Experiencing stigma during pregnancy, combined with the difficulties of managing a chronic condition like HIV alongside motherhood, can have negative consequences. Women often deny their condition, and don’t take their medication, or find it difficult to breastfeed their children. This increases the risk of transmitting HIV to their child.

The Approach

HIV positive pregnant women and feeding mothers need psychosocial support. But stigma surrounding their condition, lack of mental health care and the demands of motherhood prevent them from seeking help. The SHM Foundation and Zambart (a research collaboration between the University of Zambia’s School of Medicine and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine) will attempt to overcome these barriers by adapting The SHM Foundation’s Zumbido Model of peer to peer text message support groups to suit the needs of Zambian pregnant and feeding mothers living with HIV, with an aim to improve ART adherence and prevent onward transmission.

In 2017, we were awarded a prize at the United Nations General Assembly for our work – the prize money will be used to launch Project Insaka in July 2018. Insaka will be implemented with women living with HIV attending antenatal clinics and receiving HIV treatment in Chipata and Kanyama (settlements within the Lusaka town).

Partners

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